Patient Follow up – Colleen Mescall

We talked to Colleen Mescall in November of 2015 about her recent image guided tendon treatment to relieve her foot pain. You may remember this video.

We recently caught up with Colleen to ask her how she’s doing today, and how the treatment has made a difference in her life.

How has your activity level changed since having image guided tendon treatment at VCU Health at Baird Vascular Institute? Before, my feet hurt all the time – walking, standing, or getting up from sitting they hurt; I did not really like to walk or stand for a long period, but now I can take walks, go sightseeing ,etc. without having pain or discomfort.

How long did it take you to feel fully recovered? Within 6 months of having both feet done, I noticed I could get out of bed in the morning without the painful first few steps, and now, when walking for long periods, I no longer have any discomfort.

How has your life changed since having the treatment? I am more inclined to go for walks or stand when I teach a class, I have joined a gym and take classes and I can wear heels again (that’s one of the best parts).

Would you have the surgery again if needed? I hope to not have it again, but if I had to do it again I most definitely would.

Would you recommend this treatment to others? Absolutely! And I have recommended it to others.

We’re so glad that Colleen is back in her cute shoes and feeling fantastic. You may be wondering, “Is image-guided treatment right for me?” If you answer yes to these questions, it may be time to discuss our image-guided tendon treatment.

  • Have you given up any activities due to tendon pain?
  • Have you been suffering for three months or longer?
  • Have you taken multiple steps to get rid of your pain without lasting success?
  • Are you tired of masking the pain or enduring it rather than treating it at the source?

Call us at (804) 828-2600 to discuss whether image-guided treatment is the right option for you.

Kind words

We’re so happy when we can help a patient overcome a medical issue. We don’t do what we do for the thanks, but it’s certainly appreciated when we get a letter like this from a patient. We are glad to have helped Mr. Wagle overcome his plantar fasciitis pain with our tendon treatment procedure. Thank you, Mr. Wagle, for your kind words and confidence in our physicians and our practice.

Wagle letter[1]

Dear Mr. Chestnut,

I am writing to offer my thanks and praise. 1 wish to show my appreciation to the following; Dr. Jeffery Elbich, Nancy Lang, Jennifer Salang, Lauren Lipchak, Tiffany Brown, and Deena Omrch. From the very first phone call to my surgery on the 6th I was treated with the utmost respect and friendliness. The rest of your staff I assume is just as
good as these people. They all exhibited the level of professionalism that is beyond compare. VCU can be extremely proud of this facility and its employees.
l was lucky enough to find you by doing a google search on Plantar Fasciitis. After reviewing the excellent information regarding your innovative treatment I immediately made the phone call to schedule a consultation. I had been suffering from intense heel pain for several months. Previously l had seen an Orthopedic surgeon who had me wear a device and go to physical therapy. This only seemed to exacerbate the pain. I was at my wits end when I did the search. Thank God for your web site and l am more than willing to sing your praise to any and all who might suffer from this malady.
May God Bless you and your staff and keep you under His countenance always.

Warm Regards,

John Wagle, III

What’s involved in a Vascular Health Screening?

Vascular disease is a broad term that describes a number of conditions of the circulatory system that affect millions of Americans each year.

According to the Society for Vascular Surgery, “Sometimes people who have potentially threatening vascular disease may not be aware of its presence because warning symptoms have not yet developed. For this reason, vascular screening is used as a method to detect the presence of serious vascular disease in the general population before it has a chance to cause harm.”

Vascular diseases range from diseases of the arteries, veins and lymph vessels, to blood disorders that affect circulation. When disease occurs in the arteries, less blood is delivered to the tissues, reducing the oxygen and nutrients needed by the tissues of the body. Types of vascular disease include coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD).

Diagnosis of vascular disease is made on the basis of your medical history and symptoms, but generally begins with a physical exam. Your healthcare provider will begin by checking for weak pulses in the legs. Your physical examination may also include the following:

  • Ankle-brachial index (ABI): the ABI is a painless exam that compares the blood pressure in your feet to the blood pressure in your arms to determine how well your blood is flowing. This inexpensive test takes only a few minutes and can be performed by your healthcare professional as part of a routine exam. Normally, the ankle pressure is at least 90 percent of the arm pressure, but with severe narrowing it may be less than 50 percent. If there is an abnormal difference between the blood pressure of the ankle and arm, you may require more testing. Your doctor may recommend one of the following tests:
  • Doppler and Ultrasound (Duplex) imaging: is a non-invasive method that visualizes the artery with sound waves and measures the blood flow in an artery to indicate the presence of a blockage.
  • Angiography: This procedure is generally reserved for use in conjunction with vascular treatment procedures. During an angiogram, a contrast agent is injected into the artery and X-rays are taken to show blood flow, arteries in the legs and to pinpoint any blockages that may be present.

How should a patient prepare for a vascular screening?

  1. Write down any symptoms you’re experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to your condition.
  2. Write down key personal information, including a family history.
  3. Make a list of all medications, including OTCs (over-the counter), vitamins and supplements that you’re taking.
  4. Write down questions you want to ask the doctor. List your questions from most important to least important in case time runs out. Some basic questions to ask include:
  • What is likely causing my symptoms?
  • What are other possible causes for my condition?
  • What kinds of tests will I need?
  • What are the risks and benefits of the tests and the treatment plan you recommend?
  • What are the alternatives to the primary approach that you’re suggesting?
  • Are there any diet or activity restrictions that I need to follow, either for the tests or the treatment?
  • Should I see a specialist, and if so can VCU Baird Vascular Institute recommend a specialist?
  • What is the cost of the tests and the treatments?
  • Does insurance usually cover the tests and treatments? (You will need to ask your insurance provider directly for specific information about coverage.)
  • Are there any brochures or other printed material that I can take home with me?
  • What websites do you recommend visiting for more information about my condition?

Familiar faces set patients at ease

Patients at VCU Baird Vascular Institute (BVI) appreciate the convenient location, hassle-free parking and easy appointment service. However, the most important thing is seeing the caring, professional and familiar faces of the BVI staff.

When patients come in, they not only receive VCU’s world-class medical vascular services in the convenient near West End neighborhood location. Patients also see people they know; staff members who have worked with them at previous appointments so they feel more at ease.

“We run a very tight-knit team here,” said Megan Quinn, manager of BVI. “If patients come to visit more than once, they will see the same people from the front desk staff to the nurses and technologists.”

When patients arrive, the friendly front desk staff will greet them. New and returning patients can utilize BVI services such as:

• Port Placement for Cancer Treatment

• Dialysis Access Management

• Peripheral Vascular Disease Treatment

• Vascular Ultrasound

• Cosmetic Vein Procedures

Then, in the treatment and lab area, nurses and technologists who are familiar with the patients will talk about their care plan, their medical history, answer any questions and go over next steps. This can be reassuring to patients who are experiencing any anxiety about their situation.

“When patients come back to BVI they will see people who know their story, their history and can walk them through the process,” said Quinn.

Located just off Interstate 195 at 205 N. Hamilton Street, VCU Baird is the convenient, friendly, familiar place for non-emergency vascular needs. To find out more, please call (804) 828-2600 or email bairdvascularinstitute@mcvh-vcu.edu.